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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 664 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the disconnect that i was alluding to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental d
. one of my clarion -- four years ago i talked at clarion which is a wonderful science-fiction five week-long six weeklong boot camp and teachers come in and go a week and i did week 4 which i was told was when everybody cries and others break down. they did not have nervous breakdowns which was great. at one point, one of my guys -- can you tell whether your letters going to make it? and i said no. and some of us are brilliant and some of us -- how do you tell? no. ones who are going to make are the ones who write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant may have written brilliant stories and never write again. but the ones who get in and they write every day and finish their stories and then write the next one they will make it. i saw him four months ago in arlington as he was nominated for a nebula award and he said you know, it works. he didn't get the award but still very proud of him. my wife and i loved the audio versions and never worked. you are such a terrific voice actor. did you have those voices in mind as you were writing the book? i suppose i did but also ha
and it will be a financial boost for the city. >>> lawrence is out and about with the preview of the bay area science festival. what are you doing? >> oh, yeah. guys, i got to get this plane built. let me tell you, we're working on this really -- oh, i think i just bent the wing. [ laughter ] >> we'll have to do a little redo on that. but we're here enjoining the science festival at the tech museum of innovation. it's a great chance for you to bring the kids down. the whole family. there's something for everyone if you want to do it. it's taking place today and this weekend. so get down here and enjoy it if you want to do that. tell you what the weather is going to be great. we're looking at a lot of sunshine toward the afternoon. just a couple of high clouds drifting by. it's a little chilly in spots. some 40s and 50s. we are looking' patchy fog in the valleys so watch out for that. through the day, that should lift. high clouds will drift through but temperatures will be mild mainly in the 60s and 70s. but you know what? as we look toward the weekend that ridge really taking over. temperatures cou
is coming down to science -- numbers-crunching, door-knocking, message-crafting science. and that extends to politics at every level, including a critical group of tight senate races. at this point does anyone really know what is going to dies -- decide all this, gloria? >> no. [laughter] look, it's coming coup -- down to a smaller and smaller group of undecided voters. if you ralk -- talk to republicans, the karl rove theory is that this late in the race, undecided rote -- voters will go to the challenger. if you talk to workers for president obama they say that's not the case. others say they might just stay home and decide not to vote. what you saw in those clips you were just showing it the candidates making their closing arguments because in the end after all the negative ads, which i think at this point probably cancel each other out and it's just a lot of noise out there right now, it comes down to a matter of trust. what -- who do you trust? whose character do you really believe in? and overall whose opt tism -- optimism do you kind of buy into? >> we have heard mitt romney with a
is playing the science guy. i don't think you're ever coming back, lawrence. >> reporter: no. this is a lot of fun. a lot of kids can come down here and make some really interesting neat stuff. it's all part of a neat science festival they have at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to check it out. they have all kinds of things. this is what they are going to be using to launch some of those planes right here in the lobby and around the tech museum. they have exhibits, imax, real scientists that you can come down and meet and ask them very important questions too. the silicon valley really the center of what has been major innovations that really changed the world. you can come down and meet some of the scientists who have helped to make some of the changes. of course, the weather looking nice now. we are talking about some sunshine coming our way. we're going to need it this morning. it's chilly in spots, low 40s in the north bay valleys, 50s elsewhere, partly cloudy skies. we have a couple of patches of fog and high clouds likely to drift across our skies for today so
much. our next speaker is the co- founder and chief scientific officer of post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california o
of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be lo
, science. the next group of student s is our students who have the correct number of credits to be a junior, but they are missing one or more of those benchmarks. it could be for a variety of learners such as being an english-language student who have to take their core english classes later. it could be because they have failed one or two core classes. but these are students who have made the correct number of credits, but one of those benchmarks need to be made up. and then we have students who are "off-track," who should have 110 credits, but they are down to 80. we look at those students and say targeted credit recovery and credit options could graduate on time. and then we have moderately off-track and severely off-track students. so in looking at the overall data where we are now with our current junior class, the class of 2014. there is two charts. one of them shows our graduation requirements, which is the chart on the right. our graduation requirements currently are that you pass the courses within an a through a d grade. the uc-eligible, in order to get into uc, you do need to h
are joined from the weather team with more on the science of all this. what is causing a storm of this magnitude? >> ape ve very rare case that t hurricane made landfall in new jersey. it is hurricane season so we do see a lot of storms this time of the year. usually we do not have a high-pressure system over the atlantic, called the blocking anti-cyclone, pretty self-explanatory from that name. but, you said this high-pressure system acts like a block. it is locked out of this system to move into the northeasterly path which usually -- the storms take place, take paths in that direction. but due to this high pressure sitting over here, for a while, it is very strong. cushions it, toward the eastern seaboards, of the united states. and this time -- it did make a landfall in the eastern coast. hence, the biggest storm in generations. now it has the become a remnant of low-pressure systems, so, it is much weaker than, than it was when it hit a landfall. though the tropical moisture brings all the humidity and turns and makes a lot of downpour as cross ts across the. you can see t
an answer or maybe not oh easy answer. this is not just something that is science fiction. we have to deal with it. anything that anybody has mentioned. >> we keep hearing everybody talk about it. we're going to come back and learn from this and build something stronger arrested better. you hear the politicians say that now after this situation that we've had. i have not heard one specific thing like this is what we're going to do. this is how much it's going to cost. homeland security secretary quoteds a saying, this could be the most expensive recovery in history. hurricane katrina cost $106 billion. that's how much it cost to recover from that hurricane. this is going to surpass that. people are going to be thinking what can we do better so we don't have these horrible situations happen, and spending all this money that america will have to spend to recover from it it. >> eliot: the ex-spans and swath from new jersey, pennsylvania upwards, the devastation is huge. the economic toll, the cost of human life enormous, and awful to see. brandi hitt, thank you for joining us tonight. >> eli
in lossangeles... to see a piece of hhstory.the space ssuttle science center. the science guy."the retired shuttle wwll stay n this pavilion until the museum builds a new air and sppce wing... which should be done ((2-shot toss to weather)) 3 (((d lib meteorologist)) 3 ((traffic reporter ad libs)) ((traffic reporter 3 meteorologist)) 3 ((traffiicreporter ad llbs)) 3 ad libs))((traffic reportee -3 3 3((raffic reporter ad libs)) map 3955 ap 40 map 3 3 3 3 still to come... know your-waast-to-hip atio. ratio.the health risks that number.connected... to a high - super storm sandy... expected dollars.where it ranks... among the hurricaaes in recorded u-s history. ((break 2)) p3 ((break 2)) stephanie rawlings-blake: voting for question seven is an... incredible opportunity for baltimore. jim smith: question seven will bring table games like... blackjack and poker to baltimore. stephanie rawlings-blake: you're talking about 500 new jobs. ken ulman: and increased tourism will mean more business... for maryland's small businesses. jim smith: and instead of marylanders spending... five hund
their home. three days after sandy left the northeast in crisis, finally, science of recovery. >> we are all working together to make sure the new jersey moves ahead. >> police say they are making progress clearing roads left impassible by sand and homes tossed into the street. >> you feel you are going to wake up any minute. it is sickening. >> for evacuees who have not been allowed back to see their homes, the wait is agonizing. >> what can you do? hopefully everybody can rebuild. >> in hoboken, people are pumping murky floodwater out of garages. in queens, assessing the damages to more than 100 burned out homes. in jersey city, a line for gasoline 100 cars long. in brooklyn, waiting for public transportation. those devastated by sandy moving on but still struggling to assess what has been lost. across the nation, people are stepping up to help. tomorrow, new jersey native bruce springsteen and pancho villa will participate in a benefit concert. -- bon jovi will participate in a benefit concert. >> medical volunteers will help give care to those stranded by flooding and source 911 calls. >
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by thoma
to measure in science and engineering when they go to college they're much less likely to get what they call stem degrees in the science and engineering and math degrees if they receive a large preference. a study by friends of mine at the university of virginia found that if you take to students of any color one of whom received a large preferences and one of whom doesn't, the student with a preference has about 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on his path through. the mismatch also affects if with academically inclined students that receive large preferences who with like to become university professors or going to academics sunday, but very predominantly receive low academic grades, clustered at the bottom of the class and decide that academics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experience was in california where the voters passed proposition and we had a large cause i national experiment about what happens when racial preferences are banned from the entire system. the results are extremely clear 21 the bothers. within a half-dozen on the neutrality the number of blacks in
often our conversations about these issues are exclusively engineering and physical science kinds of questions. those matter, no doubt. they're fundamental, but there's a social dimension to this as well, which neighborhoods are affected, which individual people are affected, and it's predictable. >> fascinating, zone "a" ev evacua evacuated, low-lying residents there were twice as likely to be residents of. >>> i want to bring in ed markey, co-sponsor of the only climate bill to ever pass the chamber of congress. congressman, what is your reaction to the stunning absence of this issue that you worked so hard on and labored over and ground out a large bill with tons of technical details to carve votes on and it's now disappeared from the political conversation? >> well, i think that -- i think that mother nature decided that she was going to inject it into this election. if it wasn't going to be raised in any of the debates, then she was going to find a way of having this be discussed. and so this election for next tuesday is now framed. it's mother nature versus the unrestrained
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. ♪ make it worth watching. ♪ the new 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> hello, everybody. i'm melisilissa rehberger. wall street will be back in business tomorrow. they will reopen wednesday after hurricane sandy shut down trading for two days. the organizers of the new york city marathon say they are going ahead with sunday's race despite the damage caused by sandy. meanwhile, ubs announced it will cut up to 10,000 jobs by 2015. they say they're tryin
that this is all bogus science? who -- are they phonies? are they quacks? >> there are different motivations. some people don't want to hear about global warming because it's bad news and there's enough bad news in the world and everybody has plenty to worry about anyway. some people don't want to hear about it because it gets in the way of their economic interests, those would be the fossil fuel companies, for instance. and some people are just generally skeptical and don't like experts, and, frankly, i don't like experts all the time myself either. but these are the facts. every academy of science of every major country in the world has said this is happening. it's happening now. it's only going to get worse until we start taking actions to stem the emissions that are causing the problem. but in the meantime, this stuff is going to be happening even if we get emissions under control for some time, for decades, so we have to learn how to adapt better, how to prepare for such a potential disaster, how to mitigate their damages. >> we don't have any high ground to go to in this where we have 6 bill
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
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of california's death penalty. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler is here with a look. >> reporter: a moral, ethical and economic debate, does the death penalty help protect us? >> reporter: prop 34 would repeal the death penalty. instituting life without parole. retroactive for the 725 right now. a 17% undecided. but a trend just the last two weeks, yes, jumped 4 points to 45%. could prop 34 pass? >> that is unknown at this point but it stands a better chance today than three weeks ago. >> reporter: the cost argument, $100 million a year to keep it. there are strong arguments on both sides. >> what is the right punishment for the evil? it isn't just about the killer. >> it is about public policy. how do we spend, what keeps us safer? >> yes, it is cheaper to lock them up than to execute them. >> we waste a bunch of money either way. >> reporter: our poll found religious differences. catholics favorites it. prodstants oppose it -- pausestants oppose it. the bay area supports repealing the death penalty. southern areas of the state oppose it. don't forget to vote tuesday. health and
can happen. stick around to see what happens when a science loving guy tries to carve a pumpkin using explosives. it's a bad combination. eggs, bacon, and pancakes. denny's everyday value slam is four dollars every day. wait, is that right? eggs, bacon, pancakes. yeah. that's right. the four dollar everyday value slam. only four dollars every day. only at denny's. with lysol disinfectant spray. and use the lysol no touch hand soap for 10 times more protection with each wash. this season, a good offense is the best defense. lysol. mission for health. >>> thanks for joining us this morning. a halloween pumpkin carving experiment goes terribly wrong and the whole thing on live tv jason lindsey is known as the hooked on science guy and he was trying to demonstrate how you can use a small explosion to carve a pumpkin. he precut the eyes, the nose and the mouth. he even filled the pumpkin with a chemical formula. here's what happened when he ignited the lighter. >> we're going to try this. are you ready? >> i'm ready. >> are you sure? >> i think so. >> okay. let's see here. we blew up the w
by country. >> it is country by country but it is changing. there is a body of science behind this in terms of brain development. if you're not stimulating kids in those early years, and they're not getting the early stimulation they need, we know that their brain does not develop the same way as if they were. that's the same. that's when you have a child in malawi or in california. it's exactly the same science. we're trying to use that science in really pushing for early childhood. and then showing again, programs on the ground that actually demonstrate the effectiveness. in the u.s. we do a lot of early childhood preschool. we then test the kids. we do testing with the children to see where they are in terms of their capabilities. >> cenk: why >> gavin: why haven't we with all that evidence that you point to, we know the best investment the best return is on the front end, not the remedial side. what is it about our educational system or perhaps more importantly our leadership in this country that hasn't started to adjust those dollars or enhance those dollars in the investment. >> that
. something i deal with as a science reporter is the fear of discussing the nuance in this science conversation because i'm afraid when i talk about how this is a really nuanced problem, it adds fuel to them saying it happened years ago. all of a sudden the climate deniers say this can't possibly be global warming. >> they use the advantage of science, which is we're not certain about everything. we do experimentation and give you a parameter within which things can happen, an explanation, and we have hypothesis theories, and they go aha you don't know. i know because god told me. god turns out to be the koch brothers right? >> i'm loving all of the tweets, you know sandy is god's way of... i actually sent out a tweet last night it's not god's way of anything. nature has no agenda here. >> we're used to that. these big storms have always been accompanied by those who want to attribute it to a divine course. that's absurd on its face. i don't know what to say to that. >> thank you guys, actually come back and stay with us and we'll have more discussions about the ramifications later
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> governor christie throughout this process has been responsive. he's been aggressive in making sure that the state got out in front of this incredible storm. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and the people of our state. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie standing together side by side surveying the damage from hurricane sandy. they have gone from adversaries to praising each other. my guest michael moore. we did cover the rockaway blaze in the midnight show on monday night in to tuesday morning. i was anchoring that toward the end. we were one of the first networks to get it on the air. >> but two or three hours after it happened. my point is, can you imagine if 110 homes were burning right now in los angeles? >> sure. >> it would be another three hours we heard about it. >> no. but you have to take it in the context of everything else going on in new york. >> my point is that everything going on wa
tonight 10:00 p.m. eastern. but first more "viewpoint" coming right up. politics. >>science and republicans do not mix. >>now it's your turn at the only online forum with a direct line to eliot spitzer. >>join the debate now. >> eliot: we've heard all the promises excuse, smart lines and grotesque misrepresentations. now it's time to choose. the choice is easy. on one hand you have the leader who saved us from sure fiscal di it waster, watched over a recuperating economy preserved our national security and guided our nation's international relations in rough waters insured landmark universal access to healthcare and pushed historic social policy with respect to immigration and civil rights. his challenger is supply-side reagan omics disciple who says he is fit to lead. he says he has a plan but when asked over and over for specifics can't produce. the arithmetic doesn't work. he's a governor who shares the social views he embraced to get to the primaries. he became a meyer pawn of the radical republican party, not a leader of it. on issue after issue the choice couldn't be m
. susan mchale, director of the social science research institute and one of the corps organizers of the network is here with us today. can you please stand and be recognized? thank you. [applause] >> we also made a pledge to educate our university community about ethics. it is one thing to know the rules, regulations and policies. it is another thing to create a culture where every employee wants to do the right thing the first time everytime. through training and awareness building efforts, we are trying to help people understand the how, when, where and why of reporting. i assure you can state takes this commitment very seriously. that is not a glib promised. to prove it we have stepped up our efforts and compliance. like most universities and state has dozens of compliance professionals. they are responsible for insuring research funds are appropriately used. they monitor our ncaa compliance, financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting and administer many more regulations related to the health, welfare and safety of those on camp
and the budget crisis here at s-j-s-u is dr. charles bullock ... the dean of the college of applied sciences and arts. thanks for joining us .... so dr. bullock, as an educator what stance are you telling your teachers to take in terms of prop 30? what is this school facing if prop 30 doesnt pass? what should students be prepared for or be doing to plan for next semester? can you guarantee that students who are planning to graduate next semester will be able to get the classes that they need? do you remain optimistic about the future of higher education in california and why? thanks for joining us dr.bullock the u-s census bureau says latinos make up one of six residents in the united states. so with the election day less then two weeks away... will the latino vote have an impact (?) update news' pedro garcia shows us the last minute push to register latinos to vote. ">>>on the corner of story and king in east san jose...a group that advocates for immigrant rights...siren attempted to get latinos registered to vote. jeremy barousse/ siren "we are out here registering voters. it's the last da
of people that are far advanced when it comes to science and technology, and even the ability to socialize with each other- we are more socially mature than most people that i meet outside of america. but i think we are far behind our advancement in technoscience and technology when it comes to social maturity- perceiving what society should be, what a human being is. i think we have exaggerations, some of us, of what a human being is and what we should expect of a human being- exaggerations- and some of us poorly estimate the value of human beings. so we are not- to me, we are not the greatest society when it comes to social maturity. >> you know, that's one of the problems we've wrestled with in this class over and over again, because we hear such beautiful statements of love and caring and equality and justice coming from deeply religious people, and it's like you say, you know, somehow we haven't matured to a level that even respects the religions we profess. i'm just curious, in terms of your understanding of islam, how does that, in your own life, lend itself to making us better- bet
for it. -- to work for it. [applause] we should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. change comes when we live up to america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our
. but you're quite right that many scientists have been very cautious and science has a cautious culture. you could almost say a conservative culture. their peer review process discourages them from even thinking about going out on a limb. and so they -- they are inherently cautious and conservative. but the evidence is now so overwhelming. you know, in the last ten years you showed some of the statistics but there there's an analysis of the extreme hot temperatures on the surface of the earth. they're now 100 times more common than they were just 30 years ago. and it is these extremely hot temperatures that are responsible for the increased evaporation, the increased water vapor in the air the increased drought. and remember this is hardly the only climate related disaster that we've had this year. 65% of the united states has been affected by a very widespread and extreme drought this year. food prices have been affected. much of the west, including the epic fire in colorado springs was on fire this summer
happened here, where so many experts in the field of environmental science have suggested that what is happening with these severe weather systems is becoming more frequent, as a result of climate change? >> well, martin, governor romney hasn't said a whole lot about a lot of things recently. you know, folks asked him 14 times yesterday, whether he was going to -- whether he wanted to get rid of fema. the last thing he heard or the last thing i remember hearing from governor romney on climate change was, he was questioning the science of climate change. and this is the same person who, when he was governor the first two years, was one of the leaders of reggie, the state consortium of governors, who wanted to do something about greenhouse gas emissions. two years later, he pulls out of it, as he was ramping up his run for president, the first run for president in 2008. so i think, you just -- he's been on every side of this issue, so the latest incarnation is that governor romney has questioned the science behind climate change. >> but also, john, i remember mr. romney's speech at th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 664 (some duplicates have been removed)